Sweeney: Interest Arbitration Will Pass Senate

Monmouth County Freeholder Serena DiMaso, Keansburg Deputy Mayor Jimmy Cocuzza, Congressman Frank Pallone and Senate President Steve Sweeney talk before Sweeney's Town Hall Meeting in Keansburg. Pallone was not impressed.

Monmouth County Freeholder Serena DiMaso, Keansburg Deputy Mayor Jimmy Cocuzza, Congressman Frank Pallone and Senate President Steve Sweeney talk before Sweeney’s Town Hall Meeting in Keansburg. Pallone was not impressed. Click for larger view.

Senate President Steve Sweeney told MMM today that he expects a key provision of New Jersey’s 2%  property tax cap that is set to expire on April 1 to be extended.

The interest arbitration provision of the property tax reforms passed with bi-partisan support three years ago caps arbitration awards in government labor disputes to 2%. Since they’ve been implemented the average arbitration award resulted in salary increases for local government employees to 1.86%–the lowest in 20 years. The provision will expire on April 1 unless extended by legislation.

“It’s my bill,” Sweeney said, “I’ll pass it next week.”   Ask if the arbitration cap would become permanent or extended with another sunset provision, Sweeney said, “That’s what we’re working on now.  I’d just assume we done with it, but we’ll get the best we can.”

Sweeney said that while negotiating the original property tax reforms that he favored a 0% cap. “That would force municipalities to, if not consolidate, to share, to share services.”

Sweeney spoke to MMM after his sparsely attended Town Hall Meeting at the Bayshore Senior Day Center in Keansburg this afternoon.

 

Posted: March 20th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: NJ State Legislature, Property Tax Tool Kit, Property Taxes, Stephen Sweeney | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

O’Scanlon: Time to make Interest Arbitration Law permanent

Task force study on arbitration reform confirms law works – and is essential

declan-oscanlon-budgetFollowing up on his comments last week that allowing the interest arbitration law to expire on April 1st would have disastrous consequences on towns and property taxpayers, Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon will introduce legislation on Thursday that would make the law permanent.

From January 2011, when the law took effect, to September 2013, average raises in contracts, whether through arbitration or negotiations, were 1.86 percent — the lowest in at least 20 years. O’Scanlon was a member of the task force charged with studying the effects of the law since its inception and said there is no doubt the cap has been the single most significant tool responsible for the stabilization of municipal budgets.

“The data contained in the task force report is irrefutable that the interest arbitration law works and is an essential element in helping towns control costs,” said O’Scanlon, R-Monmouth. “The cap on arbitration awards was a critical part of our 2010 reforms and was the most important tool ever enacted to bring under control the never-ending, upward pressure on property taxes and the gradual strangling of local government services.  One simply cannot logically argue that we can maintain a cap on property taxes without providing this tool for municipal officials to control their largest expense categories.

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Posted: March 19th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Declan O'Scanlon, Press Release, Property Tax Tool Kit, Property Taxes | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Property tax battle: Deadline looms on expiration of key law

Property tax battle: Deadline looms on expiration of key law (via NJ.com)

TRENTON — Mayors say a group with an obscure and achingly bureaucratic name has been the most important tool in slowing the growth of New Jersey’s property taxes, the highest in the nation. For the last three years, arbitrators who decide contract…

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Posted: March 9th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Property Tax Tool Kit, Property Taxes | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment »