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Why Amazon Did Not Choose New Jersey

By Senator Robert Singer

Senator Robert Singer

A whopping 238 cities across the United States sought to be the home of Amazon’s second headquarters, dubbed “HQ2.” Of all city applicants, Newark, New Jersey offered Amazon the largest tax benefits in the country. Regardless of being one of twenty cities to make the final cut, Newark was passed over by Amazon not once, but twice. It speaks volumes that a package of tax incentives totaling $7 billion could not entice Amazon to choose New Jersey.

Our state’s prime geographic location, diverse workforce, state-of-the-art infrastructure, convenient transportation, and best-in-the-nation schools should have made the Garden State an easy sell. The New Jersey Legislature’s successful bipartisan effort to top all other competing tax incentive offers nationwide should have made the Garden State an easy choice. The competition was fierce to court HQ2, and New Jersey was in play.

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Posted: February 27th, 2019 | Author: | Filed under: New Jersey, Opinion | Tags: , , , | Comments Off on Why Amazon Did Not Choose New Jersey

Fort Monmouth joins fevered pitch for Amazon’s coveted HQ2

Fort MonmouthMONMOUTH COUNTY — Add Fort Monmouth to the list of places throwing its hat into the crowded ring vying for Amazon’s planned second headquarters and the potential for 50,000 jobs. Though Fort Monmouth has already leased half of its available 1,100 acres, officials there say it has room in Oceanport and Tinton Falls to house the… Read the rest of this entry »

Posted: September 26th, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: Monmouth County News | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments »

Should online purchases by subject to sales taxes?

Since a 1992 U.S. Supreme Court ruling (Quill v North Dakota) online sales have largely been exempt for state sales taxes.  In Quill, SCOTUS ruled that sellers did not have to collect sales taxes unless they had a physical presence in the home state of the buyer.

Consumers in many states, including New Jersey, are required to pay the sales taxes on online purchases themselves.  Few do and few states do anything to enforce the tax.

In 1992 online sales were not such a big deal.  However 20 years later, America makes $200 billion per year in online retail purchases and states are losing out on $23 billion in sales tax revenue, according to a Washington Post report.

Large “brick and motar” retailers complain that the online exemption creates a pricing disadvantage for them and a cost, as consumers shop for items in their show rooms but then purchase items online at the lower price, often from smart phones while still in the retail show room.

Local retailer Vic Scudiery, owner Hazlet electronics seller IEI and the former Chairman of the Monmouth County Democratic Party, has long held that the state is losing out by not taxing online sales.  Scudiery told MMM that IEI’s monthly sales tax paid to New Jersey was over $20 thousand before the majority of its sales shifted from store visits to the Internet.  Now, Scudiery says his store generates less than $8000 per month in sales tax for New Jersey while overall revenues continue to grow.

Mega online retailer Amazon had long been opposed to collecting sales taxes, in part because the process of collecting and reporting sales taxes for thousand of jurisdictions is too cumbersome and confusing.  But Amazon has abandoned that argument as it has changed its business model.  As the company aggressively opening new distribution centers in many states, including New Jersey, to reduce the time and cost of its shipping of consumer products, it is cutting deals with states that would allow it avoid collecting sales tax for a year or two and get state income tax credits if they build and hire. In New Jersey, Amazon will build two huge distribution centers, create 1500 jobs.  The company will start collecting New Jersey’s 7% sales tax from Jersey residents in July of next year under a voluntary agreement with the Christie administration.

NetChoice, a trade association lobbyist, who’s members clients include eBay, facebook, Overstock.com and Internet wine sellers, are continuing to fight sales taxes based on the complicated and cumbersome argument.

Bi-partisan federal legislation, The Marketplace Equality Act, would authorize states to collect sales tax from online retailers shipping products into their jurisdictions and require, that if the states choice to impose that tax collection on retailers, that they simplify the process and, in some circumstances, provide software to the sellers that would calculate the appropriate tax.

Republican governors, lead by Gov. Chris Christie, have dropped their long term opposition to taxing online sales and endorsed the Marketplace Equality Act, according to the Wall Street Journal.

 

Posted: July 16th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Taxes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Escort procedures are secret

Bob Ingle writes this morning that the government is protecting its butt by keeping documentation of escorts classified.

Bob is writing of the New Jersey State Police luxury sport car escorts that have been in the news recently.  Not the Secret Service’s recreational activities.

Ingle is the co-author with Sandy McClure of The Soprano State, the New York Times bestseller about New Jersey’s culture or corruption.  His new book, written with fellow Gannett reporter Michael Symons, Chris Chrisite: The Inside Story Of His Rise To Power, arrives in book stores on May 22.  Pre-orders are available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Books-A-Million.

Posted: April 26th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Bob Ingle | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »